Granville Sharp in 1798 formulated a rule for Greek grammar that is used by translators of the New Testament. This rule applies in 100% of cases with no exceptions.

This rule, in brief, is that when the copulative και (“and”) connects two nouns of the same case, if the definite article (“the”) precedes the first noun and is not repeated before the second noun, the latter noun always refers to the same person that is expressed or described by the first noun.

Example:

The car stopped and out stepped it’s wonder and driver.

This means that there is one person who stepped out and that person both owns and drives the car. It does not mean that two people stepped out of the car, a separate owner and a separate driver.

I and waiting for my wife and soulmate to come home.

It means that there is one person he is waiting for, who is not only his wife but also his soulmate. It does not mean he is waiting for two persons, the one being his wife and the other being his soulmate.

I have to ask my best friend and boss about this.

This means that there is one person and that person is both his best friend and also his boss. He is working for his best friend. It does not mean that he has to ask two different people, one being his best friend and the other being his boss.